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As Seen in the Movies!
avatar May 05, 2018 10:10PM
Vintage movies used a standard method of showing someone looking at their watch. It's interesting to see what watch is used. This one is from a 1948 Film-Noir classic, "Raw Deal", one of the films directed by Anothony Mann with the cinematography done by John Alton, who was soon in great demand. They had just finished "T-Men" the year before from the Hollywood poverty row studio Eagle-Lion Films. The poverty row studios cranked out the B-movies on small budgets, and the best of them knew exactly how and where to cut cost corners without being blatantly obvious about it. Among them were a slew of post-WWII Film-noir.

In "Raw Deal" a woman's lover is about to break out of prison at 11:30 PM, and the nervous woman looks at her watch as she waits in a car on a road next to the prison wall. Not to hard to figure out how this was done for anyone who had done the HWS before. It's a classic HWS, albeit with a not so hairy woman's wrist, and the camera was a fairly good-size 35mm B&W film camera with a close-up lens. The watch? A Swiss Made Gruen Veri-Thin and my best guess is it's from some time in the 1940's. Gruen is a tragic story that hit the rocks in the 1950's and never fully regained itself after a 1958 buyout, eventually failing in the late 1970's. In addition to the "Veri-Thin" they also created the Driver's Watch on the side of the wrist and the long, narrow case "Curvex" that curved gently around the wrist. This watch is the very typical tiny woman's watch of the era with either a thin cord or a thin metal bracelet.



John



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As Seen in the Movies! Jpeg Attachments John Lind 72 May 05, 2018 10:10PM



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